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The Covington-Cincinnati Suspension Bridge Committee (CCSBC) is a citizens group dedicated to the preservation and enhancement of the John A. Roebling Bridge.

Learn more about what we do and please consider joining our efforts.

The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge 

(Officially opened January 1, 1867) 

The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge, named for the civil engineer who designed it, has been an iconic Cincinnati suspension bridge along the city skyline for nearly a century and a half. When the Roebling Suspension Bridge opened to traffic on January 1, 1867, its 1,057-foot span made it the longest suspension bridge in the world, a record it retained until 1883 when Roebling’s most famous project, the Brooklyn Bridge opened. 

In the end, the bridge proved an engineering marvel, the first of its kind to employ several new bridge-building techniques. Its most impressive feature: the two main cables, each containing 5,180 individual wires imported from England. A second set of cables was added in 1896 to support even heavier loads. 

Although the Roebling span shares the riverfront with several bridges today, it remains a major thoroughfare for pedestrians and vehicles. Many use it to get to work each day or as the path of choice to enjoy the bars and restaurants along both the Covington and Cincinnati riverfronts. Be sure to walk across the bridge to get an up-close look next time you’re in the area and plan to attend Roebling Fest held each June when Roebling enthusiasts come together to celebrate the landmark.

 

2018 Photo Contest Winners Released

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The 2018 Roebling Suspension Bridge Photo Contest was a roaring success! There were many very nice photos and winners were chosen by popular vote. Thank you to all the photographers who applied their craft to contribute such wonderful images of our historical landmark. And thank you to all those who voted online to determine these community chosen winners.

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“It was unquestionably the finest as well as the largest bridge of its kind built until that time. Both structurally and architecturally it was a triumph.”

David McCullough

 

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The CCSBC welcomes cash or electronic donations to support the work of the Committee. Please donate online using the button above.


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